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Archaeological Pedagogy

Students use the archaeological pedagogy projectMy research into Archaeological Pedagogy began as part of my Undergraduate Teaching Associate experience in the fall of 2016. The project began as an effort to teach research design and process to undergraduate students in ATH 212: Introduction to Archaeological Theory and Method. Through a collaboration with my faculty mentor, Dr. Jeb Card, we created a card game meant to simulate archaeological research design and excavation methods. The lab was sorted into teams of 4-5, and each team was given a set amount of play money as "grant funds". Students were then able to take these funds and stategically choose potential assets. Students would then randomly select findings, as well as "Stuff that Happens in the Field", which involve a variety of scenarios that can occur to archaeologists in the field. Students had an opportunity to use leftover funds to purchase new assests, baring in mind their implications on past and present findings.

Research Goals: 1-Answering the primary question: “How can archaeological research design and process be taught to undergraduates in an engaging and informative manner?” 2-Exploring the creation and implementation of a card-based research design game
Research Outcomes
a group of students play the research design game in lab
Students use the research design game in the lab

The first version of the research design game was used in ATH 212: Introduction to Archaeological Theory and Method at the end of the fall 2016 semester, with Dr. Jeb Card as the instructor.

Student feedback on the usefulness of the lab assignment was overwhelmingly positive, and the Anthropology Department intends to use the project in future courses.

Sample Cards
Sample of the completed cards
Sources

Boone, Elizabeth Hill. 1993. "Collecting the Pre-Columbian Past: Historical Trends and the Process of Reception and Use". In Collecting the Pre-Columbian Past: A Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks, 6th and 7th October 1990, edited by Elizabeth Hill Boone, pp. 315–350. Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington D.C..

Day, Jasmine. 2006. The Mummy’s Curse: Mummymania in the English-speaking world. Routledge, New York and London.

Florescano, Enrique. 1993. "The Creation of the Museo Nacional de Antropología of Mexico and its Scientific, Eductional, and Political Purposes". In Collecting the Pre-Columbian Past: A Symposium at Dumbarton Oaks, 6th and 7th October 1990, edited by Elizabeth Hill Boone, pp. 81–103. Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington D.C..

MacDonald, Sally. 2003. "Lost in Time and Space: Ancient Egypt in Museums". In Consuming Ancient Egypt, edited by Sally MacDonald and Michael Rice, pp. 87–99. Encounters with Ancient Egypt. Institute of Archaeology, UCL Press, London.

MacDonald, Sally and Catherine Shaw. 2004. "Uncovering Ancient Egypt: The Petrie Museum and its public". In Public Archaeology, edited by Nick Merriman, pp. 109–131. Routledge, London

Special Thanks to: Dr. Jeb Card, Miami University Department of Anthropology
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